Category: ANL

Elle McDonald ready for the next step

A NEW addition to the Melbourne Vixens ranks in 2020, training partner Elle McDonald has had an explosive past year, selected for the 2019 Vic Fury squad in the Australian Netball League (ANL) and subsequently getting the call up to the Vixens for the 2020 Suncorp Super Netball season.

McDonald has not followed the typical state talent pathway, instead working her way up the ranks through the Victorian Netball League (VNL), honing her craft through the Under-19s to division one and then championship, winning a premiership with North East Blaze in 2017. 

“When I was younger I didn’t go through the state teams pathway that most of the other athletes would have but I was really lucky to still be playing in the VNL. And I thought I’d just work my way through the Under 19 Division and then was aiming for playing in that championship team and then once I was playing that championship team I was, you know, always trying to do the best I can,” McDonald said. “From there, I kept pushing myself and was lucky enough to be named in the team of the year for the last two years, I think, so I’ve just always been trying to improve myself and go one step further.”

The speedy midcourter has no issue traversing the court, able to ply her trade in both centre and wing attack, using her speed off the mark to enter the contest and be a real workhorse in attack.

“Last year I was really lucky to be asked to play in the ANL with Vic Fury, and win the Premiership with them too … I’ve loved every minute of it and it’s been challenging, of course, I’ve had my setbacks like many other people but in a way it just made me work harder and stronger and become a better player.”

But what should have been an exciting start to the year with Super Netball coming up, has been put on hold due to the COVID-19 pandemic, with teams having to switch out regular face-to-face training for backyard workouts and video meetings.

“Yeah, it’s been challenging, but also good I think. Obviously having to train by yourself is very different, especially being used to a team sport and really supporting each other through tough training sessions and things like that,” McDonald said. “I think we’ve been very accountable, and we knew how important it was to maintain our fitness levels during isolation so we can come back as strong as possible when we were allowed to.”

Despite the challenge of taking on her first season of elite training at home, McDonald said that the team was able to conduct virtual training sessions via Zoom.

“I think we were lucky to try and squeeze in … things like that, to really get our feet moving, doing lots of footwork and ball skills against the wall or someone at home, if you had someone to pass with you occasionally, that was really helpful and I think for me, really important to try and keep up.”

That being said, the Vixens are back regularly training now meaning the midcourter can really work on those skills with a plethora of experienced players to learn off, with the likes of Liz Watson and Kate Moloney two prominent figures in the Vixens midcourt unit.

“Just being part of that environment is quite surreal sometimes but I think having role models like that to look up to and, as you said they’re so experienced, but they’re also just so encouraging and they’re really supportive of everyone.I think just being able to train alongside them and be challenged and challenge them is totally our role as a training partner and, yeah, as I said, it’s just such a good and professional environment to be a part of. I’ve been loving every minute of being part of the Vixens.”

McDonald said she is in the team to become the best player she can be, always pushing herself regardless of the level. While she has been exposed to elite pathways in the VNL and ANL along with the impressive coaching at that level, the midcourter says that the training environment with the Vixens is “amazing”.

“I just want to, you know, learn as much as I can from the coaches and the players that we have there … I’ve never had access to the facilities and the strength and conditioning coaches and programs that are put in place before, so I’m really just trying to make the most of it and just absorb as much as I can in that training environment.”

“I think we have been chosen as training partners for a reason. I think they obviously see some potential in us and we want to, you know, be the best we can,” McDonald said. “When you are going up against one of those experienced international players [you want to] to challenge them, because the more we challenge them the better we become as well.”

With significant breaks between seasons, many players pick up other fitness regimes and exercise to do away from the netball court. But for McDonald, mixed netball was a great way to keep up that match fitness and skill over the off-season, drawn to the speed and physicality of the game.

“I played mixed my last year of high school. I sort of was introduced to it and I just thought it would be fun, would get to play with a few of my friends and then I quickly realised just how talented some of the mens and mixed netballers were and how competitive that league was,” McDonald explained. “So to me, when the VNL season stopped, being able to play in the M-League competition was a really good opportunity.”

McDonald was part of the grand final winning Parkville Panthers in the 2019 Victorian M-League Mixed Premier Division, winning the female most valuable player award for the season. She said the physicality of the mixed competition helped improve her speed and ability to attack the ball strongly.

“I think it’s definitely improved my speed, just because I found like some of the boys, you know, they’re very athletic so being able to just turn and feed things quickly. As well as that, the physicality – just really having to claim that ball and pull in strong with two hands.”

While the 2020 ANL season will not go ahead, McDonald will hope to continue improving with the Vixens and prove herself among the main group, still able to play in the VNL this year. With the addition of rolling subs and the two goal Super Shot to the Super Netball season, the midcourter said that the Vixens are one of the teams in a good position with the wealth of talent at their disposal.

“I’m sure they [the Vixens] will adapt to whatever they need to, in a really positive way and I think if you look at the shooters in that team, you know, they’re very lucky to have some accurate long-bomb shooters.”

How does ANL cancellation affect netball in Australia?

WITH netball’s COVID-19 restrictions still in place for the indefinite future and the 2020 Suncorp Super Netball season put on hold until August, it was only a matter of time until pathway programs were brought into the mix with the announcement yesterday that the 2020 Australian Netball League (ANL) season has been cancelled due to difficulties arising from the COVID-19 pandemic. 

The most direct of the Australian pathways to the domestic league, the ANL sees all eight states and territories compete, with matches and teams aligning with the Super Netball competition. The ANL is a direct feeder to the SSN, with players using teams as an elite development opportunity.

Announced by Netball Australia on Tuesday morning as “due to financial pressures and inconsistent restrictions on training and matches between states and territories”, the cancellation means a lot of things for different aspects of the sport – namely the Super Netball benches and training partners, with players typically playing in the ANL when they do not receive SSN game time. 

Where this affects players at the top level, it flows down at a more significant rate to the individual pathway programs of each state, with emerging Australian talent unable to match up against those hailing from opposing states and territories.

Netball Australia Executive General Manager of Performance Stacey West says that the national governing body is exploring alternate development opportunities in place of the competition.

“We recognise that this is a lost development opportunity for this cohort,” she said. “A group including athletes, coaches and officials that we seek to nurture and progress each year to support our high performance pathway. “This [alternate opportunities] is likely to be similar to the centralised talent camps Netball Australia delivers at the Netball Centre of Excellence based at the AIS, which involve skill development, match play and education.” 

Netball Victoria released a follow-up statement on Tuesday afternoon, announcing a newly devised 2020 Victorian Elite Development Squad program, providing elite development across two squads made up of athletes from both the 2020 Victorian Fury and 2020 17/U and 19/U Victorian State teams.

Victorian Fury head coach, Di Honey and Netball Victoria Pathways Manager, Cathy Fellows have been announced at the program’s helm.

“Whilst today’s announcement was obviously disappointing for all the athletes and support staff involved, who have put in so much work already this year, we’re looking forward to be able to continue working with Victoria’s best up-and-coming netballers to technically develop their skills to an elite level,” Honey said.

Unfortunately, the cancellation of the ANL could prove more significant a loss than other competitions, with the plethora of talent involved in the pathway potentially unable to progress in their development without game time against opposing state and territory talent, meaning less opportunity to be brought up the ranks to a Super Netball club if the chance arises.

Thus far, no official announcements have been made regarding individual state competitions, which will come down to each state’s netball governing body.

While the ANL cancellation is unlikely to have a major impact on the future of netball in Australia, it is important to recognise the significance of the lack of game time these players will get, with the influx of international netballers in the Suncorp Super Netball already seeing less opportunity for ANL players to prove themselves at the top level.

Top 15 SSN training partners: #1 Emma Ryde

WITH a number of netball leagues across the world being suspended due to COVID-19, the Draft Central team is making a case for the top 15 training partners stepping up to the Suncorp Super Netball plate in 2020. This countdown is purely opinion-based, taking into consideration recent form, individual potential and future development. Coming in at number one is none other than Collingwood Magpies goaler Emma Ryde, a dominant performer who has been unlucky to not receive a consistent contract at Suncorp Super Netball level.

Named the 2019 Australian Netball League (ANL) MVP, Ryde was crucial in the Victorian Fury outfit as a holding goaler, able to use her body cleanly to attract the defender and use the space to get hands to ball. With clean hands, accuracy and height to match, there is no denying the impact Ryde has when she takes the court. The 22-year-old made a fantastic return to netball in 2019 after taking time off for injury, using her netball smarts to take her game to a new level and ultimately playing at each level last year. At 197cm, Ryde can be a real target at the post with her ability to take on the contest, and with a strong work ethic and tactical mindset she can be a threat taking on any opposition. 

Coming up through the Victorian netball pathways, Ryde was snatched up by the Adelaide Thunderbirds as an injury replacement player in 2019, picking up a few domestic caps along the way although injury cut her time short. Playing four matches for the ailing Thunderbirds, Ryde shot 66 goals at 93 per cent accuracy, well and truly making herself known to the league as a handy option who can jump on court and have an impact. Ryde has also trained and played with Melbourne Vixens in the past, gaining valuable experience and court time and making for an impressive resume despite not taking the court consistently in the Super Netball.

Season 2020 sees Ryde join forces with Collingwood Magpies as a training partner, returning to Victoria once more and with the opportunity to learn from crafty veteran Nat Medhurst and Jamaican young gun Shimona Nelson, among a smattering of young Magpies stars coming up through the pathways. Still young and with plenty of potential, Ryde has plenty left in the tank and will hope to prove herself on the Super Netball stage once more in 2020.

Read our 2019 feature with Emma Ryde here.

TOP 15 SSN TRAINING PARTNERS SO FAR:

#15 Ashlee Unie (Sunshine Coast Lightning)
#14 Ruby Barkmeyer (Melbourne Vixens)
#13 Tippah Dwan (Queensland Firebirds)
#12 Matisse Letherbarrow (GIANTS Netball)
#11 Chelsea Blackman (Adelaide Thunderbirds)
#10 Sunday Aryang (West Coast Fever)
#9 Latika Tombs (GIANTS Netball)
#8 Sharni Lambden (Collingwood Magpies)
#7 Jacqui Newton (Melbourne Vixens)
#6 Allie Smith (Melbourne Vixens)
#5 Elle Bennetts (GIANTS Netball)
#4 Brooke Allan (Magpies Netball)
#3 Tayla Fraser (NSW Swifts)
#2 Beth Cobden (Adelaide Thunderbirds)
#1 Emma Ryde (Collingwood Magpies)

Top 15 SSN training partners: #4 Brooke Allan

WITH a number of netball leagues across the world being suspended due to COVID-19, the Draft Central team is taking a look at the top 15 training partners stepping up to the Suncorp Super Netball (SSN) plate in 2020. Inside the top five and in at number four is Collingwood defender Brooke Allan. With so much talent at our disposal, this countdown is purely opinion-based, taking into consideration 2019 form, individual potential and future development.

The 21-year-old defender is still coming into the prime of her netball career but has already shown that she has the potential to become a permanent figure in the Magpies outfit. Having spent time with the successful Geelong Cougars in the Victorian Netball League (VNL) and Victorian Fury in the Australian Netball League (ANL), Allan has displayed her class and defensive tenacity. Her ability move between goal keeper and goal defence is a testament to her on-court netball nous and endurance.

In her short career, the skilled goal keeper has been recognised for her netballing prowess with selection in the Under 19 Australian team while also taking home the grand final MVP in 2017 for her impressive efforts with Victorian Fury. After switching to the Tasmanian Magpies in 2018, Allan tasted further success helping guide her side to their first ANL premiership. With so many accolades already to her name, Allan will be hoping to extend to her trophy cabinet and take the leap to the next level and become a more commanding figure in the goal circle. Her pressure over the shot and physicality in the goal circle are just a couple of key components of her game style.

While she is yet to make her debut at Suncorp Super Netball (SSN) level, Allan displayed her elite capabilities in New Zealand taking part in the Super Club tournament where Collingwood came out victorious. Her strength under the post to keep the shooters at bay and put doubt in their mind is impressive. She consistently displays her ability to hold her own against challenging shooters with her quick footwork and ability to cleanly get around the body. Allan is deceptively light on her feet given her height and stature and makes full use of her long limbs to cause disruptions to the oppositions attacking flow. The Magpies defender is not afraid to back herself in the contest and is strong in the air, able to compete and force a turnover with her impressive timing and positioning.

Still honing her craft, Allan has exposure to one of the worlds most renowned goal keepers in Geva Mentor. The England Roses star oozes class, composure and sheer brilliance, always able to make something out of nothing such is her netball mind and skill. Throw in new recruit and Jamaican representative Jodi-Ann Ward and Allan has plenty of talent to model her craft off. With fellow youngsters Mel Bragg and Matilda Garrett also amongst the Collingwood defensive line-up, expect Allan to draw plenty of confidence from their rise up the ranks, hard work and on-court impact. Further exposure to the highest level of professionalism and netball talent will only help the young defender to perfect her role and become a force to be reckoned with in years to come.

TOP 15 SSN TRAINING PARTNERS SO FAR:

#15 Ashlee Unie (Sunshine Coast Lightning)
#14 Ruby Barkmeyer (Melbourne Vixens)
#13 Tippah Dwan (Queensland Firebirds)
#12 Matisse Letherbarrow (GIANTS Netball)
#11 Chelsea Blackman (Adelaide Thunderbirds)
#10 Sunday Aryang (West Coast Fever)
#9 Latika Tombs (GIANTS Netball)
#8 Sharni Lambden (Collingwood Magpies)
#7 Jacqui Newton (Melbourne Vixens)
#6 Allie Smith (Melbourne Vixens)
#5 Elle Bennetts (GIANTS Netball)
#4 Brooke Allan (Magpies Netball)

Top 15 SSN training partners: #7 Jacqui Newton

WITH a number of netball leagues across the world being suspended due to COVID-19, the Draft Central team is taking a look at the top 15 training partners stepping up to the Suncorp Super Netball (SSN) plate in 2020. Sitting at number seven on the countdown is Melbourne Vixens training partner Jacqui Newton. This countdown is purely opinion-based, taking into consideration 2019 form, individual potential and future development.

At only 23, Newton has already tasted success thanks to her defensive prowess and impressive skillset. In 2018 the interchangeable goal keeper, goal defender played in the grand final and took out the premiership title in the Victorian Netball League (VNL) with the City West Falcons. She followed up those efforts, going one better in 2019 helping to guide the Victorian Fury to title glory in the Australian Netball League (ANL).

Her ability to have a profound impact at both levels of netball is a testament to her commitment while her desire for success and to push herself further shows her dedicated mentality. She is not afraid to put her body on the line and throw herself at the ball passing by. Newton is an exciting player to watch, quick on her feet and offers consistency when on court. Standing at 185cm she is not the tallest defender but makes up for it with tenacity and quick footwork to get around the body of her opponents and remain in the hunt for the ball.

Newton has had limited exposure to the Suncorp Super Netball level playing just a couple of games but is yet to really crack into the market and showcase her array of talents. Surrounded by the likes of Australian Diamonds duo Jo Weston and Emily Mannix, Newton is aware of the workload and defensive attributes needed to make a splash at international level. Throw in Jamaican up and coming star Kadie-Ann Dehaney and Newton has no shortage of defensive masterminds to learn from, when it comes to perfecting her craft whether it be pressure over the shot or movement inside the circle.

While she is still developing, Newton has showed that she can hold her own up against some talented young guns in the ANL. The more suited goal defence is light on her feet, able to dart around the court and put in the blocks at the top of the circle to stop her opposing shooter from entering the circle with ease. She works hard on transition, constantly looking to re-offer across the court and bring the ball down to deliver to the attackers. Her strong ball movement and accuracy with ball in hand also puts her in good stead for a potential step up to SSN level.

TOP 15 SSN TRAINING PARTNERS SO FAR:

#15 Ashlee Unie (Sunshine Coast Lightning)
#14 Ruby Barkmeyer (Melbourne Vixens)
#13 Tippah Dwan (Queensland Firebirds)
#12 Matisse Letherbarrow (GIANTS Netball)
#11 Chelsea Blackman (Adelaide Thunderbirds)
#10 Sunday Aryang (West Coast Fever)
#9 Latika Tombs (GIANTS Netball)
#8 Sharni Lambden (Collingwood Magpies)
#7 Jacqui Newton (Melbourne Vixens)

Top 15 SSN training partners: #8 Sharni Lambden

WITH a number of netball leagues across the world being suspended due to COVID-19, the Draft Central team is making a case for the top 15 training partners stepping up to the Suncorp Super Netball plate in 2020. Coming in at number eight is Collingwood Magpies midcourter, Sharni Lambden. This countdown is purely opinion-based, taking into consideration recent form, individual potential and future development.

A talented defensive midcourter, 22-year-old Lambden has caught plenty of attention on the international stage from a young age, part of the Australian Diamonds Development Squad 2016 with plenty of drive to improve and consistency through the centre despite not yet having that big opportunity to line up in the Super Netball. Lambden is a valuable partner with the Magpies, able to apply pressure on both the ball and the player while also being able to be that impact player where required. While unlucky on the Magpies part with injuries aplenty over the court last season potentially impacting the side again this season, Lambden could have a real chance to break into the Collingwood side if she puts her best foot forward at training.

With an ability to switch between centre and wing defence, Lambden can be a crucial link-up through the midcourt with her drive down the court and ability to switch between offensive and defensive mindsets with relative ease. Already familiar with the training partner role after being on the list for the past two seasons with the Magpies, Lambden will look to continue her development alongside midcourt injury returnees Madi and Kelsey Browne while Ash Brazill is sure to be a solid mentor playing a similar role at the club despite being highly unlikely to make her return in 2020. A crucial link through an already star-studded midcourt at the Tasmanian Magpies in the Australian Netball League, Lambden has been touted as a massive threat for a while coming so will look to put that into practice this year.

TOP 15 SSN TRAINING PARTNERS SO FAR:

#15 Ashlee Unie (Sunshine Coast Lightning)
#14 Ruby Barkmeyer (Melbourne Vixens)
#13 Tippah Dwan (Queensland Firebirds)
#12 Matisse Letherbarrow (GIANTS Netball)
#11 Chelsea Blackman (Adelaide Thunderbirds)
#10 Sunday Aryang (West Coast Fever)
#9 Latika Tombs (GIANTS Netball)
#8 Sharni Lambden (Collingwood Magpies)

Top 15 SSN training partners: #10 – Sunday Aryang

WITH a number of netball leagues across the world being suspended due to COVID-19, the Draft Central team is making a case for the top 15 training partners stepping up to the Suncorp Super Netball plate in 2020. Heading up the top 10 is 2019 West Coast Fever debutant Sunday Aryang. This countdown is purely opinion-based, taking into consideration recent form, individual potential and future development.

Ethiopia-born Aryang may be young but what she lacks in age she well and truly makes up for in talent, with impressive speed and elevation. The defender can be a threat both inside and outside the circle with her lanky arms and ability to cover ground, able to apply impressive pressure on the shot or deny entry to the circle depending on what her team needs. Aryang may not have a wealth of experience at the top level, but training behind Australian Diamonds goal keeper Courtney Bruce and against the likes of 198cm Jamaican Jhaniele Fowler in the circle, her development with this Fever unit will be crucial. 

Fellow West Australian pathway athlete Olivia Lewis is a handy player to follow the footsteps of, with the fellow defender earning her place on the bench and a playing a crucial role in helping Aryang up through the ranks. Aryang is a key member of the Western Sting side playing in the Australian Netball League (ANL) and a member of the 2019 Under-19 Australian squad. With clean hands and good anticipation of the play, Aryang is a great defensive prospect for the future, while her versatility will come in handy throughout her development with plenty of rotational options giving her plenty of opportunity to gain valuable court time.

TOP 15 SSN TRAINING PARTNERS SO FAR:

#15 Ashlee Unie (Sunshine Coast Lightning)
#14 Ruby Barkmeyer (Melbourne Vixens)
#13 Tippah Dwan (Queensland Firebirds)
#12 Matisse Letherbarrow (GIANTS Netball)
#11 Chelsea Blackman (Adelaide Thunderbirds)
#10 Sunday Aryang (West Coast Fever)

Top 15 SSN training partners: #11 – Chelsea Blackman

WITH a number of netball leagues across the world being suspended due to COVID-19, the Draft Central team is making a case for the top 15 training partners stepping up to the Suncorp Super Netball plate in 2020, with Adelaide Thunderbirds defender, Chelsea Blackman up next. This countdown is purely opinion-based, taking into consideration recent form, individual potential and future development.

With a few years on the sidelines of the Adelaide Thunderbirds under her belt, Blackman is one to watch for the future with plenty of grit and determination out in defence. Now coming into her third consecutive season as a training partner, Blackman has flourished under the tutelage of the dependable and talented Layla Guscoth, Shamera Sterling and Kate Shimmin through the Thunderbirds camp and, from what we’ve seen so far out on court, has relished the opportunity to learn off the experienced players. The young goal defence has plenty of intensity and strength to hold her ground, able to anticipate the ball well and in turn cause issues for her opposition.

The young defender got the opportunity to take the court on two occasions during the 2019 Super Netball season, making her debut in Round 10 last year against the Melbourne Vixens and was a valuable option on the bench for the Thunderbirds following the resumption of the Super Netball competition after the completion of the Netball World Cup in July. Blackman currently plays for Southern Force in the Australian Netball League (ANL) and plays for Contax Netball Club in the Netball South Australia feeder competition. Valuable court time with the Tbirds has done wonders for her development and with a few more opportunities out on the court the South Australia-born will once again have a chance to build on her skill this year.

TOP 15 SSN TRAINING PARTNERS SO FAR:

#15 Ashlee Unie (Sunshine Coast Lightning)
#14 Ruby Barkmeyer (Melbourne Vixens)
#13 Tippah Dwan (Queensland Firebirds)
#12 Matisse Letherbarrow (GIANTS Netball)
#11 Chelsea Blackman (Adelaide Thunderbirds)

Top 15 SSN training partners: #12 Matisse Letherbarrow

WITH a number of netball leagues across the world being suspended due to COVID-19, the Draft Central team is taking a look at the top 15 training partners stepping up to the Suncorp Super Netball (SSN) plate in 2020. Coming in at 12 is former NSW Swifts and current GIANTS Netball training partner Matisse Letherbarrow. With so much talent at our disposal, this countdown is purely opinion-based, taking into consideration 2019 form, individual potential and future development.

Letherbarrow burst onto the scene at a young age with the talented goaler touted for her impressive skill under the post. Although she is still only 18 Letherbarrow has already had a highly decorated career ranging from representing and captaining her state at the National Championships to playing in the under 17 Australian squad. Her talent is undeniable able to mix it with the best in the competition and given she is still so young her trajectory is high. Though she is yet to debut for a SSN club her ability to have a profound impact at domestic level such as Australian Netball League (ANL) for the NSW Waratahs is a testament to her sheer netball understanding. She has been playing in the ANL since she was 16 highlighting her skill to play against the bigger and more experienced bodies in the competition and more importantly her ability to not get overwhelmed. Letherbarrow was a strong force in the goal circle for the Waratahs in last year’s grand final backing herself from range and using every inch of the circle to reposition and gain some sort of ascendancy over her opponent. At 188cm, Letherbarrow is not the tallest shooter but knows how to use her body and push back against the defenders to be a commanding figure in the goal circle. Her clever movement, strong footwork and vision allows her to create space and drop back into it when needed. Although her reliance on the back space can make her a bit predictable, further development will help to add a couple more strings to her bow. Throw in her agility and Letherbarrow oozes potential and excitement for Australian netball. Her strong hands and strength on the take also makes her a dominant shooter while her twinkle toes on the baseline is a testament to her impressive balance.

Training alongside the likes of England Roses star Jo Harten, Australian Diamonds captain and goal shooter Caitlin Bassett and fellow youngster Kiera Austin, Letherbarrow is surrounded by some classy players that could easily teach her the ropes at SSN level. Expect Letherbarrow to have a big year and develop at a rate of knots given the calibre of players around her.

TOP 15 SSN TRAINING PARTNERS SO FAR:

#15 Ashlee Unie (Sunshine Coast Lightning)
#14 Ruby Barkmeyer (Melbourne Vixens)
#13 Tippah Dwan (Queensland Firebirds)
#12 Matisse Letherbarrow (GIANTS Netball)

Top 15 SSN training partners: #13 – Tippah Dwan

WITH a number of netball leagues across the world being suspended due to COVID-19, the Draft Central team is making a case for the top 15 training partners stepping up to the Suncorp Super Netball plate in 2020, with Queensland Firebirds goaler Tippah Dwan up next. This countdown is purely opinion-based, taking into consideration recent form, individual potential and future development.

No stranger to training with the big-wigs, having been with the Firebirds since 2017 – her final year of high school – Dwan has had a short career thus far after spending two years as a training partner for the Queensland side before getting the official call-up for Suncorp Super Netball season 2019. However, a broken foot in early 2019 saw her downgraded to a training partner once more heading into the 2020 season, putting to a frustrating halt her development at the domestic level. 

Sitting behind the likes of Gretel Bueta and Romelda Aiken in the circle, there is no better goal attack for the 20-year-old to learn off. The combination of Bueta and Aiken has proved to be a headache for many an opposition over the years, proving to be a crucial aid in Dwan’s development. While Dwan has not yet made a formal debut at Super Netball level, she gained valuable exposure in last year’s Team Girls Cup where she showcased her clean movement and netball nous.

The young goaler has plenty of potential and leadership experience after progressing through the Netball Queensland pathways. At age 20 she has plenty to look forward to in the future, especially learning off the impressive talent at the Firebirds. Dwan is clean with ball in hand and an ability to move well in the circle without clogging space. She aims to pick up where she left off prior to injury last year, and will look to prove herself for Queensland Fusion in the Australian Netball League (ANL) this season.

TOP 15 SSN TRAINING PARTNERS SO FAR:

#15 Ashlee Unie (Sunshine Coast Lightning)
#14 Ruby Barkmeyer (Melbourne Vixens)
#13 Tippah Dwan (Queensland Firebirds)